The Joy of Teaching – An Evan-Moor Blog

Sharing creative ideas and lessons to help children learn

DIY Pocket Protector Whiteboards

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Whiteboards are an essential component of any classroom or homeschool. They offer a variety of methods and modalities for teaching, practicing, and assessing skills without using reams of paper. Whiteboards in the classroom are also highly regarded by students of all ages as an alternative form of writing!

These homemade whiteboards store easily in folders and binders and won’t take up valuable desk space. Try DIY whiteboards at home to engage your child in math, reading, and writing practice.

How to make your whiteboards

You will need: clear pocket sheet protectors, white paper, dry erase markers, and erasers.

Directions

  • Place a white piece of 11×5 paper into a clear sheet protector.
  • Use only dry erase markers to write.
  • Create erasers out of old socks or felt cut up into small squares (small enough to store in a desk).

Tip: Keep them clean throughout the year with an occasional wipe down with a wet paper towel.

How to use your whiteboards

Versatile and engaging, these whiteboards offer multiple practice opportunities without creating extra paper. They also serve as an excellent visual tool for checking your students’ understanding in under a minute.

  • Math computations
  • Spelling practice
  • Letter formation and tracing
  • Draw a picture and write a sentence (always a favorite)
  • Insert a lesson page into the protector for a simple and reusable activity

For more resources and ideas to use with pocket sheet whiteboards, check out these titles:

Basic Math Skills

 

 

 

 

 

Building Math Fluency

 

 

 

 

 

Skill Sharpeners: Spell and Write

 

 

 

 

 


Heather Foudy is a certified elementary teacher with over 7 years’ experience as an educator and volunteer in the classroom. She enjoys creating lessons that are meaningful and creative for students. She is currently working for Evan-Moor’s marketing and communications team and enjoys building learning opportunities that are both meaningful and creative for students and teachers

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