The Joy of Teaching – An Evan-Moor Blog

Sharing creative ideas and lessons to help children learn

Halloween pumpkin filled with candy

October 12, 2017
by Evan-Moor
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Halloween Math Center Activity: Candy Counting

Halloween pumpkin filled with candyCombine your Halloween and math lessons with this hands-on candy counting lesson. Perfect for developing students’ critical thinking skills, this Halloween activity offers practice with data collection, graphing, and algebraic thinking. Try this candy math activity for classroom centers or a Halloween party idea. Candy graphing is sure to be a hit with students!

Materials

Plastic bags with assortment of Halloween candy: 8 varieties in random amounts

Crayons (up to ten colors)

Student record sheet (download your free copy here)

Halloween Candy Counter Center for graphing and data collection.

Directions

  1. Each student receives a record sheet, crayons, and bag of assorted candy (decide ahead of time the rules for eating/keeping candy).
  2. Students sort and record the amount of candy they have in their bag.
  3. On the back of their record sheet, have students’ record information that can be learned from their graphs.

Extension

Have students compare two types of candy with their neighbor. Who had more of a specific type? Have them write a number sentence on the back of their record sheet.

For more Halloween lesson ideas, see Halloween Lessons and Activities for the Classroom.

For more higher-order-thinking activities check out Hands-on Thinking Activities: Centers Through the YearBook cover of thinking activities throughout the year

 

 

 

 


Heather Foudy is a certified elementary teacher with over 7 years’ experience as an educator and volunteer in the classroom. She enjoys creating lessons that are meaningful and creative for students. She is currently working for Evan-Moor’s marketing and communications team and enjoys building learning opportunities that are both meaningful and creative for students and teachers alike.

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Teacher playing phonics and word games with students.

October 3, 2017
by Evan-Moor
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Fun Phonics Activities and Games

Teach your students to read with phonics worksheets, activities, and games. Build strong reading foundations in kinder, first grade, and second grade students.

Phonics instruction plays a key role in teaching students to understand the sounds of letters and that certain letter combinations make specific sounds. Practicing phonemic awareness helps students decode words and increases their word recognition, which ultimately increases their reading fluency.

Here are a few fun phonics activities and resources to include in your daily lessons.

 

1. Rhyming Phonics Game
Gather sets of rhyming objects to play the game “rhyme in a bag.” Place half in a paper bag and half on a table. Have students reach into the bag, pull out an object, and match it to an item on the table that rhymes.

  • Pen, hen
  • Sock, rock
  • Fan, can
  • Boat, coat

Rhyming can help children understand that words that share common sounds often share common letters.

2. Phonics Flip Book
Phonics flip books can be a fun way to teach sound and letter combinations. All you need is a wire-bound index card notebook, scissors, tape, and markers. You may design your flip book to practice three-letter words and sounds, blends, or word families. Word families help children identify common spellings and sounds in word.

To make a blending flip book:

  • Divide and cut the notebook into three sections.
  • Label the first, second, and last paper with letters A–Z.
  • It is OK if your combinations don’t all make words. The purpose of this technique is to teach blending of sounds.

To make a word family flip book:

  • Divide and cut the notebook into two sections.
  • Write your word family in the last section.
  • Choose letters that form words with your word families.

 

3. Phonics Hopscotch

Count word syllables with a hopscotch game. Using chalk or blue tape on carpet, outline the numbers 1–4 in the squares. Have children take turns counting out the syllables of a word using their feet. Understanding that words can be broken apart into syllables makes it easier for readers to decode as well as spell correctly.

4. Phonics Games

Practice common phonics patterns with fun games like BINGO. The auditory and visual practice with these word patterns are a great way to get students recognizing the word patterns.

If you don’t want to make your own center activities, a great resource is Take It to Your Seat Phonics Centers.

5. Alphabet Hunt

An alphabet hunt is a fun and interactive way to teach letter and sound combinations. For beginning readers, matching objects with the same beginning and ending sounds reinforces this concept. Assign a letter of the week and have students find objects within the classroom that have the same beginning sound as the weekly letter. Depending on your class, you could assign more than one letter per week. (Students could also bring objects from home to share as well.)

6. Phonics Worksheets

Including fun phonics worksheets in your daily lessons will help students connect their learning from activities into practical application. This free downloadable lesson from Basic Phonics Skills Grades K–1 (Level B) gives students practice with beginning and ending sounds.

Free phonics worksheet: Review Beginning and Ending Sounds of /b/, /s/, and /m/

Teachers’ Recommended Resources
Basic Phonics Skills (PreK–3)
Take It to Your Seat Phonics Centers (K–3)
Daily Phonics (1–6)

Parents’ Recommended Resources
Learning Line: Short Vowels
Learning Line: Word Families

For more free lessons and activities, subscribe to Evan-Moor’s bi-monthly e-newsletter!


Heather Foudy is a certified elementary teacher with over 7 years’ experience as an educator and volunteer in the classroom. She enjoys creating lessons that are meaningful and creative for students. She is currently working for Evan-Moor’s marketing and communications team and enjoys building learning opportunities that are both meaningful and creative for students and teachers alike.

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Halloween pumpkins and jack-o-lanterns

September 20, 2017
by Evan-Moor
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Halloween Lessons and Activities for the Classroom

October is a wonderful time to incorporate Halloween lessons and activities. Check out these free Halloween reading, language, and science lessons to create the perfect Halloween project for your classroom.

Easy Hanging Spider Craft for Halloween
These dangling spiders from Art for All Seasons are the perfect addition to your Halloween and fall lessons. Plus, you can create a simple thematic unit around your spider craft and check off a few of your content standards while you’re at it.

 

Halloween Fun: Skeleton Art Project and Science Activities
This simple “Silly Skeleton” art project was one of my favorites to do with my class around Halloween time. It is easy to integrate into a science unit, and it includes a poem for reading fluency practice. Plus, the completed art projects made a festive bulletin board. As a result, when posted altogether, they created the effect of a wall of dancing skeletons!

 

 

 

Batty for Bats: Educational Bat Activities for Halloween
Create a thematic unit about bats this fall. Engage your students with fun books, discussions, and projects. Check out these great resources to build your own study unit on bats.

 

 

 

 

Educational Halloween Activities and Fun Classroom Ideas
From candy science to thinking skills to pumpkin poems, these free activities will help to keep students engaged and learning amidst the Halloween excitement and festivities on October 31! Try these Evan-Moor Halloween-inspired activities that also integrate reading, writing, and science skills. Get ideas for healthful Halloween snacks and spooky treats.

 

 

 


Heather Foudy is a certified elementary teacher with over 7 years’ experience as an educator and volunteer in the classroom. She enjoys creating lessons that are meaningful and creative for students. She is currently working for Evan-Moor’s marketing and communications team and enjoys building learning opportunities that are both meaningful and creative for students and teachers alike.

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September 14, 2017
by Evan-Moor
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DIY Pocket Protector Whiteboards

Whiteboards are an essential component of any classroom or homeschool. They offer a variety of methods and modalities for teaching, practicing, and assessing skills without using reams of paper. Whiteboards in the classroom are also highly regarded by students of all ages as an alternative form of writing!

These homemade whiteboards store easily in folders and binders and won’t take up valuable desk space. Try DIY whiteboards at home to engage your child in math, reading, and writing practice.

How to make your whiteboards

You will need: clear pocket sheet protectors, white paper, dry erase markers, and erasers.

Directions

  • Place a white piece of 11×5 paper into a clear sheet protector.
  • Use only dry erase markers to write.
  • Create erasers out of old socks or felt cut up into small squares (small enough to store in a desk).

Tip: Keep them clean throughout the year with an occasional wipe down with a wet paper towel.

How to use your whiteboards

Versatile and engaging, these whiteboards offer multiple practice opportunities without creating extra paper. They also serve as an excellent visual tool for checking your students’ understanding in under a minute.

  • Math computations
  • Spelling practice
  • Letter formation and tracing
  • Draw a picture and write a sentence (always a favorite)
  • Insert a lesson page into the protector for a simple and reusable activity

For more resources and ideas to use with pocket sheet whiteboards, check out these titles:

Basic Math Skills

 

 

 

 

 

Building Math Fluency

 

 

 

 

 

Skill Sharpeners: Spell and Write

 

 

 

 

 


Heather Foudy is a certified elementary teacher with over 7 years’ experience as an educator and volunteer in the classroom. She enjoys creating lessons that are meaningful and creative for students. She is currently working for Evan-Moor’s marketing and communications team and enjoys building learning opportunities that are both meaningful and creative for students and teachers

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Little girl doing art. Painting with fingers.

September 11, 2017
by Evan-Moor
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Art Homeschool Curriculum Guide

Teaching art in homeschooling is such a joy. As homeschoolers, we have the luxury of spending several hours at a time on artwork.

In the past, we have focused on one artist and one craft project a month. It seems to be a steady pace that allows us to get more out of our art lessons.

TEACHING ART

How to Teach Art to Children - An Evan-Moor Book Cover

A terrific art curriculum resource is How to Teach Art to Children. It offers background information, literature resources, and concise step-by-step directions for 96 art projects.

Each of these art projects will help your child learn about the elements of art and then use the elements in the styles of famous artists.

The units have description of the art concept, materials list, full-color example of a piece of art, and step-by-step instructions.

After teaching the art lessons, your child uses the materials to complete his/her own artwork to apply the art concept taught.

If you would like seasonal inspiration for your art instruction, Art for All Seasons offers a variety of kid-approved options.

The layout is easy to follow, featuring a color photograph of each art project. The materials list and step-by-step instructions make Art for All Seasons an easy way to incorporate art lessons into your family’s seasonal and holiday events.

PRACTICE and EXTEND

It is always fun to use one activity to teach more than one subject.

We all enjoy Draw…Then Write to connect step-by-step drawing with simple fun writing activities. Yes, Mom too! 🙂

Each drawing activity is listed by topic, which can be completed in any order you wish. The unit begins by showing the drawing steps and giving a space for your child to draw.

There are additional practice pages to invite your child to continue to practice drawing and complete simple writing tasks about the drawing.

Just a reminder:
Of course, you can select any of these individual titles to use in your homeschooling.

However, TeacherFileBox subscribers can access to all of the lesson plans and activities in these and other Evan-Moor books.

TeacherFileBox is a digital lesson plan library that gives you access to over 18,000 Evan-Moor lesson plans and activities!

Click here to learn more about TeacherFileBox and start your free 30-day trial.

Click to download Evan-Moor’s Art Homeschool Curriculum Guide. For additional guides by subject area, see Homeschool Curriculum Resources and Guides.


Amy Michaels is a certified teacher with 11 years of elementary classroom experience who is actively homeschooling her own children. Her mission is share the best teaching methods and resources with all homeschoolers. Amy supports parents through her podcasts, webinars, and online training for homeschoolers on her website www.thrivehomeschooling.com.

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Homeschool mom and daughter reading together.

September 11, 2017
by Evan-Moor
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Language Arts: Vocabulary Homeschool Curriculum Guide

Click here to download Evan-Moor’s Vocabulary Homeschool Curriculum Guide.

When my daughter was about 3 years old, she wanted to know “big words.” I got a kick out of teaching her words like “foreshadowing” or “nemesis” when we would discuss books we read together.

Now that my kids are older, it is important that their vocabulary continues to grow.

Since we use Evan-Moor for all of our homeschooling subjects, I was pleased to find they publish several resources for teaching vocabulary as well.

DAILY WARM-UP

Each homeschool day, we begin with A Word a Day to teach the kids 4 new vocabulary words in a week.

I appreciate how the Teacher Directions shared suggested ways to use the 36 weekly units.

It is quick and easy. We typically complete our A Word a Day warm-up in less than 5 minutes a day!

TEACH

This past year, we started using Vocabulary Fundamentals to teach vocabulary.


One of the fabulous features is that each unit offers with 3 levels of difficulty so you can easily adjust to your child’s needs with practice pages and word play activities. It is also very helpful to teach vocabulary to more than one child at a time.

PRACTICE and EXTEND

When we are ready for vocabulary practice activities that feel more like a game than “school,” I always check Evan-Moor’s Take it to Your Seat: Vocabulary Centers as assignments for practice and to apply skills in new ways. These colorful, hands-on activities are great for workboxes!

The center activities can be completed in any order, and you can also laminate the activity if you wish to use it several times.

Each center activity also includes a follow-up written response activity for your child to complete if desired.

 For additional guides by subject area, see Homeschool Curriculum Resources and Guides.

Did You Know?

Did you know that Evan-Moor wants to support homeschoolers?

Evan-Moor has a digital lesson plan library where you can access all of these titles (and over 400 more) in a subscription to TeacherFileBox.

The subscription includes all subjects and grade levels for $13 a month. Click here to start your free 30 day trial.

Evan-Moor also offers a free Facebook group for subscribers of TeacherFileBox, too!

For more specific teaching ideas and tips for using over 18,000 activities in TeacherFileBox, please join our FREE Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/TeacherFileBoxInspired/


Amy Michaels is a certified teacher with 11 years of elementary classroom experience who is actively homeschooling her own children. Her mission is share the best teaching methods and resources with all homeschoolers. Amy supports parents through her podcasts, webinars, and online training for homeschoolers on her website www.thrivehomeschooling.com.

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Little boy writing at a table.

September 11, 2017
by Evan-Moor
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Language Arts: Grammar & Punctuation Homeschool Curriculum Guide

Click here to download Evan-Moor’s Grammar and Punctuation Homeschool Curriculum Guide.

Most homeschoolers are looking for ways to make learning grammar and punctuation interesting for kids.

Evan-Moor has found a way to make teaching grammar fun and focused in your homeschooling.

WARM UP

Evan-Moor has mastered teaching concepts in short daily activities with their “Daily” series of books.

Parents appreciate the consistent, easy-to-follow layout. Kids like the quick lessons that keep them focused without overwhelming them.

Daily Language Review helps kids practice language skills. It covers punctuation, verb tense, conjunctions, word meaning, and more in 10- to 15-minute daily lessons.

Each weekly unit offers teaching ideas for each day’s focus. The layout is simple to follow for busy homeschooling families!

TEACH

Evan-Moor recently released Language Fundamentals to teach new language arts skills and vocabulary.

It is organized into units to focus on a skill or concept. Each unit includes a simple lesson to help your child learn and practice language arts skills.

PRACTICE and EXTEND

When it is time for kids to practice grammar and punctuation, we play a game we call “Be the Editor” with Daily Paragraph Editing.

This book is organized into 36 weekly units with a focus for each day. This is another book in the popular “Daily” series from Evan-Moor.

My kids get a kick out of finding the mistakes to edit! It is much more fun to find mistakes in someone else’s writing than our own. Yet the kids are using all of the grammar and punctuation rules they have learned to check for errors in each day’s paragraph.

When I am looking for engaging activities for my kids’ independent learning time, Evan-Moor’s Take It to Your Seat series is my go-to resource.

The activities feature full-color pages and are self-checking, so they are ideal for homeschooling.

We often do these activities together, or the kids can complete them as a workbox activity.

Take It to Your Seat: Language Centers includes assignments for practice and to apply skills in new ways. These colorful, hands-on activities are great for workboxes!

Another feature is that the center activities can be completed in any order, so you can choose the activities that your child needs.

 For additional guides by subject area, see Homeschool Curriculum Resources and Guides.

One final note:

If you are like most homeschoolers and want ALL of these titles, Evan-Moor has a digital lesson plan library that includes all of these titles (and over 400 more)!

The digital lesson plan library is called TeacherFileBox and is available through a subscription for $13/month or $99/year.

Since we use Evan-Moor’s books in each subject of our homeschooling, TeacherFileBox is the perfect option for our family.

If you would like to try Evan-Moor’s digital subscription, you can find more information at TeacherFileBox.com.

For more specific teaching ideas and tips, please join our FREE Facebook Group.


Amy Michaels is a certified teacher with 11 years of elementary classroom experience who is actively homeschooling her own children. Her mission is share the best teaching methods and resources with all homeschoolers. Amy supports parents through her podcasts, webinars, and online training for homeschoolers on her website www.thrivehomeschooling.com.

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Little girl with glasses smiling at the alphabet and spelling words.

September 11, 2017
by Evan-Moor
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Homeschool Curriculum Guide for Spelling

Many homeschooling families look for effective spelling curriculum options, and Evan-Moor has great options for spelling.

These titles can be used for reviewing, teaching, practicing, or extending spelling skills. This gives homeschoolers a lot of freedom to adjust to what works best for each child.

WARM UP

Building Spelling Skills is a comprehensive resource for helping students increase their spelling skills.

It is organized into 30 weekly units. Each unit has a spelling list and practice pages designed for each week’s list.

Most homeschoolers find one practice page a day is ideal for daily practice.

Each day’s lesson is planned out with no prep required. My kids can complete their practice pages on their own, so it is ideal for our spelling curriculum.

TEACH, PRACTICE, and EXTEND

We like to integrate spelling in our writing activities since writing is where we naturally use our spelling skills.

Evan-Moor’s Skill Sharpeners: Spell and Write is a full-color activity book where kids practice a variety of spelling and writing skills, which are listed on each activity page.

Skill Sharpeners: Spell and Write is organized into theme-based units. My kids like the brightly colored pages, and they enjoy the kid-friendly themes.

We enjoy learning and practicing word families because kids can learn to spell several words at a time by following a particular pattern or letters.

Evan-Moor’s Word Family Games is terrific for hands-on practice of word families.

These full-color activities improve word recognition skills and fluency and include directions, game pieces, picture dictionary, and two activity sheets.

We also like Word Family Stories and Activities for fun and easy ways to practice predictable patterns within words.

This book has engaging, reproducible stories and activities to help kids make connections with word sounds and spelling patterns.

The unit begins by introducing each word family with a quick printable.

Next, there is a one-page story featuring the word family.

Then, student practice pages and a word-slider activity can be completed to provide your child meaningful practice of the word family.

Both Word Family Games and Word Family Stories and Activities are perfect for independent practice. Kids connect to the topics and themes, and parents appreciate how effective these activities are for practicing word families.

Click here to download Evan-Moor’s Spelling Homeschool Curriculum GuideFor additional guides by subject area, see Homeschool Curriculum Resources and Guides.

Want all of these resources for your homeschooling?

Evan-Moor has compiled over 18,000 lessons and activities (including all of the lessons in the books mentioned in this blog post) to create TeacherFileBox.

TeacherFileBox is a digital lesson plan library available to homeschoolers as a subscription for $13/month or $99/year per family.

As a subscriber, homeschoolers can access all subjects and grade levels with their subscription.

If you would like to start your free 30-day trial of TeacherFileBox, click here.

 


Amy Michaels is a certified teacher with 11 years of elementary classroom experience who is actively homeschooling her own children. Her mission is share the best teaching methods and resources with all homeschoolers. Amy supports parents through her podcasts, webinars, and online training for homeschoolers on her website www.thrivehomeschooling.com.

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Little girl doing science experiement at home with protection glasses.

September 11, 2017
by Evan-Moor
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Science Homeschool Curriculum Guide

Click here to download Evan-Moor’s Science Homeschool Curriculum Guide

Learning about science can be a natural extension of a child’s curiosity about the world.

Evan-Moor has several resources that use that natural curiosity to teach children science concepts.

Each of these titles can be used to build or supplement your homeschool science curriculum.

WARM UP
If your homeschooling could use quick, daily science review, Daily Science is a great resource to consider for consistent and focused science concepts.

Daily Science has 30 weeks of engaging activities that include vocabulary practice, hands-on science activities, and comprehension tests in multiple-choice format.

The activities in Daily Science help you successfully introduce students to earth, life, and physical science concepts.

TEACH
When you are ready for your main science lessons, Evan-Moor’s ScienceWorks for Kids series has engaging activities to teach concepts in ways that students can understand.

Each concept presented includes teacher directions for lessons and reproducible resource pages such as sets of picture cards, mini-books, and lab sheets to record the results of hands-on investigations.

ScienceWorks for Kids titles offer a wide variety of topics for each grade level:

Grades K–1:
Learning About Animals
Learning About My Body
Learning About Plants
Learning About the Earth
Learning About Weather
Learning to Be a Scientist

Grades 1–3:
Animals with Backbones
Animals Without Backbones
Energy – Heat, Light, & Sound
Exploring Space
Geology
Habitats
How Your Body Works
Plants
Simple Machines
Water

Grades 4–6+:
Energy
Living Things
Planet Earth
Simple Chemistry
The Human Body
Weather

PRACTICE and EXTEND

In our homeschooling, we have found that having the kids practice their knowledge and skills helps them remember better.

One of our favorite resources for independent practice is Take It to Your Seat: Science Centers.

We use Take It to Your Seat: Science Centers for assignments for practice and to apply skills in new ways. These colorful, hands-on activities are great for workboxes!

What I like about this resource is that each center activity is listed by topic, so you can easily select the unit you would like for your child to practice.

The center activities can be completed in any order, as long as the skills have been taught to the child.

Another option that my kids enjoy is Skill Sharpeners: Science.

Since this is a full-color activity book based on a science theme, kids receive extra practice in a fun format featuring photographs to highlight each theme.

Use the Test Your Skills page in each unit as an informal way to assess your child’s knowledge.

Additional resources to enrich your specific lessons and provide hands-on science experiments are:

Like These Titles?

If you are like me and want ALL of these titles, Evan-Moor has collected all of them (along with over 400 more) into a digital lesson plan library called TeacherFileBox!

You can subscribe by month or year, and subscribers get access to ALL subjects and ALL grade levels!

TeacherFileBox is our favorite resource to build our own curriculum!

Click here to start your free 30-day trial to TeacherFileBox!

ONE FINAL NOTE:

For additional guides by subject area, see Homeschool Curriculum Resources and Guides.

 


Amy Michaels is a certified teacher with 11 years of elementary classroom experience who is actively homeschooling her own children. Her mission is share the best teaching methods and resources with all homeschoolers. Amy supports parents through her podcasts, webinars, and online training for homeschoolers on her website www.thrivehomeschooling.com.

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August 31, 2017
by Evan-Moor
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Does Tech Time Make You Cringe? Technology Organization 101

Once of the biggest hurdles for classroom teachers and technology is the wasted instructional time they encounter while training their students. Here are some strategies to minimize wasted time and get the most out of your classroom technology lessons.

  1. Instructions: Always include a printed copy of instructions and passwords at your computer station or on the board for one-to-one users. Write students’ individual passwords on their nametags or in their journals for easy access.
  2. Gradual release of responsibility: Before allowing students to explore sites on their own, model the assignment first to the whole class. Each new task should be modeled and practiced before students are expected to complete one on their own. (This may seem time-consuming, but it will save you time in the long run.)
  3. Accountability: Hold students accountable for their technology time so their learning is purposeful. If the programs they are using do not give automated feedback to teachers, introduce screen shots and response writing as a lesson wrap-up.
  4. Assign tech helpers: Assign a few tech helpers in each class who are adept at technology. Be sure to include instructions and rules about when these students may be interrupted for help.
  5. If you have a classroom with one-to-one devices, label and number devices and assign each student a number. This strategy is a quick and easy method for passing out and collecting Chromebooks or tablets without wasting precious instructional time.

Technology can open the world to your classroom. It can challenge students to become content curators as well as content creators. A little organization and planning will go a long way in making your technology lessons meaningful and stress free.

Quick tip: It is always a good plan to have a technology back-up lesson in place. You never know when the electricity or internet servers will go down, and no one wants to be stuck with 30 students and no plan.


Heather Foudy is a certified elementary teacher with over 7 years’ experience as an educator and volunteer in the classroom. She enjoys creating lessons that are meaningful and creative for students. She is currently working for Evan-Moor’s marketing and communications team and enjoys building learning opportunities that are both meaningful and creative for students and teachers alike.

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